Mueller is senile

Watching Robert Mueller yesterday, I was struck by the appearance of early senility. I mean that in a medical sense, and not as an insult, though I am not qualified to make a professional estimate. Amidst all the prevarications, the deliberate wasting of time, the failure to understand plain questions, and the meandering, it was clear to all, including Democrats, that the purpose of putting Mueller before the panel failed. Nothing would stick. It could not be used as the basis of impeachment proceedings, no more than the report bearing his name, which also failed in its purpose.

It is hard to understand what the Democrats think they would have achieved had they “won” yesterday. The experience of Nixon and Bill Clinton show how utterly divisive impeachment proceedings are. What the Democrats sought yesterday was to avoid being crushed in the next election by being able to avoid fighting Trump. It is not going to happen. And they will be crushed.

See Breitbart; see Tucker Carlson.

This does not mean that those caught in the Democrat’s delusory framework will open their eyes to the oncoming train in the tight tunnel. Those who have bought into Trump-as-evil-Russian puppet remain obdurate in their refusal to see who is the puppet of Russia; think the Steele dossier is true; and think the man a racist for telling off brown Somali Muslim woman in the Squad for her evident hypocrisy and ill-will towards America. There will always be at least 40% of the American population who think the Republicans are the agents of Satan. 40% are Republican. The remaining 20% are open to persuasion. Increasingly they look at what the Dems are proposing: intersectionality, radical identity politics, open borders, soft on crime, gun-controlling, and they will not like what they see.

I predict a lot of sensible Democrats are going to go into the polling booth and pull the lever for Trump, despite everything.

“Not a famine of bread”

This is from the Anglican liturgical calendar for the sixth Sunday in Pentecost. It is from the Book of Amos, which is only a few pages long.

“The time is surely coming, says the Lord God,
when I will send a famine on the land;

not a famine of bread, or a thirst for water,
but of hearing the words of the Lord.

They shall wander from sea to sea,
and from north to east;

they shall run to and fro, seeking the word of the Lord,
but they shall not find it.”

I have been thinking much on the theme of a famine, not of bread, but of hearing the words of the Lord. In my considered opinion, this is an exact description of our current state of being in North America. See previous blog postings for your evidence.

If you keep hammering white people, they will unite

I cannot condense Bret Weinstein’s address better than he does himself.

Bonding through racial/tribal/genetic affinity is way older than bonding through reciprocity (trade and political organization).

As you break down bonding through affinity, you naturally build the strength of bonding through genetic likeness.

When you back people against a wall, they will be compelled to unite, despite any previous disunity. Intersectionality backs white people against the wall, and claims they should have no rights, that they are inherently evil because of their genetic nature.

The liberal order is being destroyed by intersectionality, which is the claim that virtue is a numbers game based on degrees of supposed oppression. White people cannot be oppressed, everyone else, to a degree, has been.

As white people are backed into a no-win corner by intersectional analysis and action, they will be forced to unite on the basis of their racial/national/tribal basis.

Which is what we see happening?

Banned in the Name of Freedom

From the category “You Can’t Make It Up”, a conference in London, England, on media freedom, hosted by England and Canada has banned the Russian news media RT and Sputnik from attending and reporting! [here]

Nothing like a good dose of hypocrisy and lies to get the ball rolling. Naturally, Canada’s Russia-hating bloviator Chrystia Freeland is among the commissars of the charade.

Only in this day and age where the Fake News Media are the organs of INGSOC and CANSOC could this pathetic show take place. And they wonder why their credibility is in the gutter.

Rebel Yell

Delingpole on the Climate Wars

Never mind about the science: for Delingpole, the climate thing is a branch of the culture wars.

The question I am asked when I express my doubts about climate catstrophism to the true believers is: how dare I question the consensus of people who know so much more than I do? To which Delingpole answers at minute 21 of this interview…

The impending slaughter of the Democrats and other good news

Fortunately for them it will only be a metaphorical slaughter at the ballot box. As Conrad Black opines this morning in American Greatness…..

https://amgreatness.com/2019/07/09/tired-irrelevant-democratic-candidates-point-to-trump-reelection/

Plus Boris Johnson is shortly to lead the Conservatives in the UK on a platform of taking the UK out of the European Union completely, and not trying to negotiate with Brussels.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Johnson

So there is much reason to be content this morning.

Henry VIII and Trump

I was listening to the British historian David Starkey on the subject of Henry VIII about whom, says Starkey, “he is the only monarch of England whom everyone can remember by his shape”.

Professor David Starkey refers to the English Reformation as England’s first Brexit, in as much as England departed the Roman Catholic space, dominated by the Hapsburgs, and found its modern self in the political construction of “the King in Parliament”. The Reformation led to the discovery and assertion of national sovereignty.

Now I do not wish to exaggerate the similarity, but I am persuaded that our Dear Leader Trump is despised and hated by the political elite because he is leading the United States into its own Brexit, a Brexit of a psychic kind. It is withdrawing the people from the power of the opinion elites, whether in the United States or Europe, who stand in relation to the contemporary public as the Roman Church stood in relation to the lay-people at the time of the Reformation. This relationship was of the dominator to the dominated.

Politics has been replaced by credal beliefs. Error is no longer tolerable because dissent is heresy. David Starkey is well worth listening to, and I do not intend to try to improve him by summarizing.

“The Universe made me do it”

John Horgan interviews mathematician and blogger Stephen Woit on his views about the emptiness of a lot of physics these days. The problem is that “string theory”, which invokes 13 dimensions to explain what is observed, has made no predictions that can dispute or confirm it, in thirty years of theorizing.

A sample of Woit’s approach:

Horgan: Are multiverse theories not even wrong?

Woit: Yes, but that’s not the main problem with them.? Many ideas that are “not even wrong”, in the sense of having no way to test them, can still be fruitful, for instance by opening up avenues of investigation that will lead to something conventionally testable.? Most good ideas start off “not even wrong”, with their implications too poorly understood to know where they will lead.? The problem with such things as string-theory?multiverse theories is that “the multiverse did it” is not just untestable, but an excuse for failure.? Instead of opening up scientific progress in a new direction, such theories are designed to shut down scientific progress by justifying a failed research program.

Horgan: What’s your take on the proposal of Nick Bostrom and others that we are living in a simulation?

Woit: I like quite a bit this comment from Moshe Rozali (at URL?http://www.scottaaronson.com/blog/?p=3208#comment-1733601): “As far as?metaphysical speculation goes it is remarkably unromantic.?I mean, your best?attempt at a creation myth involves someone sitting in front of a computer?running code? What else do those omnipotent gods do, eat pizza?”

I noticed that the normally astute Dilbert guy, Scott Adams, believes we are in a simulation. My reaction to that is the same as Woit’s. What would be the difference between a being powerful enough to create the simulation and a being powerful enough to create the universe as we see it?

Back to Woit’s interview by Horgan.

Horgan: Sean Carroll has written that falsifiability is overrated as a criterion for distinguishing science from pseudo-science? Your response?

Woit: No one thinks that the subtle “demarcation problem” of deciding what is science and what isn’t can simply be dealt with by invoking falsifiability. Carroll’s critique of naive ideas about falsifiability should be seen in context: he’s trying to justify multiverse research programs whose models fail naive criteria of direct testability (since you can’t see other universes).  This is however a straw man argument: the problem with such research programs isn’t that of direct testability, but that there is no indirect evidence for them, nor any plausible way of getting any.  Carroll and others with similar interests have a serious problem on their hands: they appear to be making empty claims and engaging in pseudo-science, with “the multiverse did it” no more of a testable explanation than “the Jolly Green Giant did it”.  To convince people this is science they need to start showing that such claims have non-empty testable consequences, and I don’t see that happening.

Woit is not the first person to be highly critical of the string theory movement. You can read more about it here in Woit’s blog called “not even wrong”.https://www.math.columbia.edu/~woit/wordpress/?p=5358

There is also Lee Smolin’s book, The Trouble with Physics (2006) for more on this issue.

Eric Weinstein said of string theory on the Rubin Report that it was an employment program for baby-boomer mathematicians. He did not mean it unkindly.